• Welcome (Back) To DaUnknownAdmin.Com I've been able to restore the databases for WhatChaMissin.Com, Freestyle.FM and other sites. You should be able to log in using your old login information. If you have forgotten it, you can reset your password. You can also use the facebook app to log in. Be sure to drop by our Roll Call Thread

    If I helped you to log in by resetting your password, be sure to change the password at https://daunknownadmin.com/forums/index.php?account/security

"From Correctional Facility to the Workforce"

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
The County Smarbook was created in order to assist males and females with resources prior to being released from a correctional facility.

Why Utilize the County Smartbook prior to being released from a correctional facility?
* The local County Smartbook provides each individual with many resources in their community.
* Not everyone who serves time in a Correctional Facility is able to come back home. The County Smartbook could sometimes prevent homelessness.


Where can I find the Smartbook in my County?
The County Smartbook could be found in the Department of Corrections home page.

Sample of County Smartbook (Camden County, Camden, New Jersey)
Below is a sample of the smartbook in my county. Feel free to copy and paste to your browser and review.
http://www.newjersey.gov/corrections/pdf/OTS/090311_Camden_Co_Smartbook.pdf


What type of resources does the County Smartbook provide me with if i'm still looking for work after being released from a correctional facility?
- The County smartbook provides you with programs to live in while in search of a job.
- It also provides you with the address of your local library. (You can utilize the computers to look for work online).
- The County Smartbook offers resources such as clothing donations for job interviews, financial resources, churches where you can eat and take showers.

It's your "get back on track" resource!;)


Note: I personally recommend that every family always have an updated County Smartbook. "A good neighbor is a resourceful neighbor with direction". Be sure to always keep your own personal directory aside from the County's Smartbook.

Your personal directory should include phone numbers of state, city and county contacts, in the event that a neighbor, or a local community church may need certain services. (Many people in need tend to visit churches).

Utilize your County Smartbook today!!!
When utilized correctly, the person looking to get back into the workplace will succeed, so as long as he/she has the passion to reclaim their lives.


A Personal Note from your Classifieds Section Moderator

I personally know a large number of people of whom are supervisors after having committed the worst of crimes in the past. Although they are not allowed to work certain types of employment, (such as jobs requiring you to possess a firearms, etc.), they have succeeded in finding the type of job placement suitable for them.

By utilizing the programs in their communities, they were able to move on, and even graduate from trade schools. Many of them today own their own businesses and are making some great money.

"Keep Strong"
 
Last edited by a moderator:

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
WOW! I think that is GREAT what you are doing V!

::miami::


Thank you, now that you have read this, I hope you have saved the smartbook. Remember to search for yours in your county department of corrections homepage.

There ARE resources out there, so these types of resources make us more efficient to our society. Rather than just saying "i don't know", we could just point em in the right direction.

Share it with people/programs of whom you know may need this.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
From G's to Gents/From Drama Queens to Divas - Tips on Workplace Etiquette

I have chosen to entitle this post "From G's to Gents" because this thread focuses on men (young or old), and their daily struggles with their job search due to workplace etiquette.

Tips on Workplace Etiquette
<!-- IF YOU'RE GOING TO USE GOOGLE ADS, THIS IS A GOOD PLACE TO PUT THEM -->Survival in the workplace depends on many attributes of the employee, one of them being office etiquette. Etiquette is a combination of many various attitudes of a person, all of which combine to the final outlook which creates an impression which can make or break a person. Here are some tips to follow to make a positive impression in the workplace:


1. Punctuality -
  • Be on time!!! Arrive early, but never be late. Set an example for those who arrive late.
  • If traffic jams always cause delays, plan ahead and set out early.
  • If you use public transport, also plan ahead and set out early. Hitch a lift from a colleague or friend on days you cannot find public transport.
  • Remember, rainy days always indicate heavy traffic, and if you do get stuck in traffic, call the office and let them know that you will be late.
2. Dress Appropriately –
  • While getting dressed for the office, look at yourself in the mirror and ask yourself if you can go to a party in these clothes after work. If your answer is NO, then rest assured that you are dressed appropriately for work.
  • Always remember to abide by the professional office dress code. Wear clothes that fit properly, too tight or too loose are not options.
  • Wear clothes which are seasonally appropriate. Use your common sense, avoid wooly turtlenecks in summer and avoid linen in winter. Also, do not show too much skin in winter. Carry an umbrella and an extra pair of shoes on rainy days.
  • Consider who will be there. Are you expecting visitors on a casual dress day? If so, pick out something more formal from your closet and not casual. The impression you make is the impression your company makes on the visitors.
  • Build a wardrobe on a small foundation of investment pieces with classic styling made well from high quality fabric. Stay in fashion by adding trendy items and accessories.
3. Stay away from gossip!!
  • Most of us believe that it is okay to indulge in gossip about each and every colleague in the office. Remember, there is no place for gossip mongers in the work environment.
  • If you gossip about a colleague, please keep in mind that the same colleague might gossip about you. So even if you habitually gossip, make a concerted effort to stay away from gossip.
4. Respect one another -

  • Learn to respect your seniors and colleagues. Remember, your behavior can take you a long way.
  • Respect others in order to gain respect for yourself.
5. Do not disturb others -

  • You must have team spirit to work successfully, but that does not mean you can behave like you would while watching a football match.
  • Avoid speaking loudly. Control your vocal pitch.
  • Do not speak out of turn and do not talk too much. Let others speak and refrain from interrupting them, especially your seniors. If you want to be heard, you must be ready to let others speak as well.
Conduct yourself appropriately in your workplace and win appreciation from colleagues and seniors.

(This goes for the ladies as well ;)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
Prison Fellowship

https://www.prisonfellowship.org/wh...170-interview-preparing-criminals-for-reentry


Prison Fellowship says the <?XML:NAMESPACE PREFIX = ST1 /><ST1:COUNTRY-REGION w:st="on"><ST1:pLACE w:st="on">U.S.</ST1:pLACE></ST1:COUNTRY-REGION> has done a great job of getting criminals off the street. What we haven’t done a good job of, says the ministry, is getting criminals ready to come back onto the street. The president of Prison Fellowship shares with Phil Fleischman about a program that challenges the Church to help former inmates transition back into society.
 

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
How To Find a Job After Prison - Job Interview Technique
lens5676752_1246982629Climbing.jpg
Understandably, there are challenges in how to find a job after prison - and these challenges can be daunting. Before I go into more details, I invite you to read the information I wrote earlier on this subject in my Job Application Cover Letter lens.


In this lens, I will focus on suggestions and resources. I also recommend the products that are found at www.JobInterviewTechnique.net, which can be used regardless of your personal situation (And, yes, I do get a commission if you decide to buy the product!).

Please understand that in this lens, I am not offering editorial opinion on the various factors such as discrimination or trust issues that face ex-offenders when they begin their job searches. That is a matter for social professionals to address. Here, I am simply offering suggestions that have helped some of my own former career and job search clients. Also, what may be a successful strategy in one region may not work in another region.



I am also aware that this one lens cannot possibly be all things to all people, but I've done my best. It's also a long lens! So be prepared! Having said that, let's move on.

<!--INFOLINKS_OFF--><!--/lens_intro-->Contents at a Glance

  1. How To Find a Job After Prison - Starting Over
  2. How To Find a Job After Prison - "But I'm worth MORE than minimum wage!"
  3. How To Find A Job After Prison - The Company You Keep
  1. How To Find A Job After Prison - Please Be Honest
  2. How To Find A Job After Prison - More Tips
  3. How To Find A Job After Prison - Some Observations
more...

<!-- /discovery-toc-abbrev -->Contents at a Glance

  1. How To Find a Job After Prison - Starting Over
  2. How To Find a Job After Prison - "But I'm worth MORE than minimum wage!"
  3. How To Find A Job After Prison - The Company You Keep
  4. How To Find A Job After Prison - Please Be Honest
  5. How To Find A Job After Prison - More Tips
  6. How To Find A Job After Prison - Some Observations
  7. How To Find a Job After Prison - Some Web-Based Resources
  1. Great Stuff on Amazon to Help Learn How to Find a Job After Prison
  2. I hope your found this lens: "How To Find A Job After Prison" helpful!
  3. Featured Job Interview Technique Lenses
  4. Learn Effective Resume Writing Techniques Here!
  5. Cover Letter Writing Lenses
  6. Visit my Blog for More Job Interview Technique Tips, Resume Help, and Cover Letter Writing Ideas!
  7. Visit www.JobInterviewTechnique.net for the BEST Job Interview Technique Strategies I've Seen! (That's why I'm marketing it!)
less...

<!-- /discovery-toc-full -->
New Table of Contents

<!--/module--><!--INFOLINKS_OFF-->
 

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
How To Find a Job After Prison - Starting Over


<!--INFOLINKS_ON--> How to find a job after prison takes a little different effort than the ordinary job search. Before you even begin, it is important to know exactly what avenues are open to you. For example, if you are on parole or probation resulting from a drug-related crime, it is possible that you may not be allowed to work in a pharmacy. It is critical to understand any limitations to your job search right away.

To learn what types of jobs may or may not be open to you, I urge you to speak immediately with an official related to your particular case; for example, your parole or probation officer, a judge, counselor, etc. Please do this right away so that you are clear on what direction you can take.

It is also important that you understand and accept that once you are hired, because you may be the last person hired, if times get tough, you may be the first to be let go as well. While accepting this possibility, do not let it bring you down, and do not take it personally.

Think of it this way: Even if you were not an ex-offender and were the last person hired, if times are tough, you might STILL be the first to be let go. Most of the time, if a company is willing to hire an ex-offender to begin, they are looking for someone to work for them - they are not planning on business going sour!

Take stock of what your community offers for job training and/or placement programs, and contact them quickly.

For example, there are some training programs that, once you complete their requirements, may guarantee interviews with local companies. Social service workers, employment agencies, your counselor, and/or your parole or probation officer can give you some contact information on these programs.

<!--INFOLINKS_OFF-->
<!--/module-->How To Find a Job After Prison - "But I'm worth MORE than minimum wage!"

<!--INFOLINKS_ON-->
draft_lens5676752module43852692photo_1246982798Coins_and_wheelbarrow.jpg
Understand that you may have to "start at the bottom" and work for minimum wage. Again, this is nothing personal, and no matter how experienced you feel you are, if you are offered a position starting at minimum wage, that means you can only go up from there!


If you are offered a job at minimum wage, you can ask, "Once I prove myself to you and the company, when will I be eligible for pay increases?"

And, once you've had some work experience under your belt, and you've proven yourself for several months at one job, there is no saying you cannot begin to search for something better.

But please do not give in to the temptation to job hop every time the grass appears greener elsewhere. This will not enhance your resume or marketability! You need to work consistently at one job for a while in order to gain references.

After a while, the more references you have in your favor will begin to outweigh the stigma of your ex-offender status! I have seen this in more than one person. Stick with it!



How To Find A Job After Prison - The Company You Keep

<!--INFOLINKS_ON-->
draft_lens5676752module43852702photo_1246983068Kid_with_attitude2.jpg
If you have been involved in a group or gang that has a tendency toward trouble, then it is time to make new friends. I understand that in some neighborhoods this can be very difficult. In a module below, I have included a link to a story written by Andre Norman, who spent time in prison and who now works as a motivational speaker. I love this story because it illustrates how easy it is to fall back into old routines.

Anyway, as time goes by, and you begin to gain a firmer foothold in the workforce, you may find yourself naturally making new friends who are not aligned with your old way of life. And you may find it a lot more enjoyable.


<!--INFOLINKS_OFF-->
<!--/module-->How To Find A Job After Prison - Please Be Honest

<!--INFOLINKS_ON-->
draft_lens5676752module43852712photo_1246983146Honesty.jpg
Instead of spending your time trying to figure out how to hide the fact that you were incarcerated, learn how to honestly and candidly discuss your situation with a potential employer. I know that some people will tell you to lie about your conviction, but I do not believe you should ever lie about it. Why add more difficulties to an already difficult situation? Not only that, but your past will likely catch up to you anyway.

There may come a time when your record is clear, and you no longer have to divulge your past. But until that time, you must be honest.

On most job applications, there is a space that asks if you have ever been convicted of a crime. In your case, I believe you should answer, "Yes." I also believe that you should neatly print, "Please let me discuss this with you when we meet." With so many companies conducting background checks and drug testing, it's best to get this right out in the open.

I advise becoming a "regular" at the local employment agency, and requesting mock interview assistance to practice explaining your situation. You will need to gain the confidence to look your interviewer in the eye while you explain your background.

You need to confidently get across the fact that you have paid your debt, and are working diligently to put it behind you so that you can prove who you really are inside. You are no longer the same person who committed the crime. This takes a great deal of work and practice.

Plus, you are likely to be asked tough interview questions that you should be prepared for. Practice, practice, practice!

It also takes unshakable faith in yourself that this is all true. You are a different person. You have taken the responsibility for your actions. It was your choice and your decision to do whatever it was that landed you in trouble - and there is no one other than yourself to blame for your situation.

Once you can truly come to terms with that, and begin working to release your past, then you will begin to demonstrate a lot more confidence to your potential employers.


<!--INFOLINKS_OFF-->
<!--/module-->How To Find A Job After Prison - More Tips

<!--INFOLINKS_ON-->
draft_lens5676752module43852722photo_1246983580Men_in_meeting2.jpg
I am absolutely convinced that one of the best ways to help yourself is this:
Network and gain "informational interviews" with different companies while you search for a job.

I have just completed a series of lenses on this topic, and I strongly encourage you to plan some of these activities. What the informational interview is, is an appointment with someone of influence within a company that is in a field of interest to you.

You are not applying for a job at that moment; rather, you are learning more about what it takes to be successful in a company such as that. You can ask the folks at the local employment agency for assistance in locating companies and individuals who can help you with this. My lenses on this topic are:
The Informational Interview and Preparing for an Informational Interview.

Then there is the matter of references.

If you have been in prison, you probably don't have a lot of references. Although this is a difficult challenge, you'll just have to work on it, one day at a time. You may have to take the first job that an employment assistance program or agency is able to find you, and stick at it long enough to prove yourself so that your employer will be willing to provide a reference when it's time for you to move on.

If you have been maintaining a relationship with a spiritual counselor, you might ask if he or she would be comfortable being a reference - perhaps as a character reference, and speaking about your strengths and how you have grown.

If you have kept up friendships throughout your incarceration with people who are 1) not ex-offenders themselves, and 2) can speak about your job performance or strengths that you showed prior to your troubles, perhaps they might be willing to vouch for you.

The thing to remember - which I understand may be difficult - is that you are NOT the crime you committed. You are a person who made a mistake, you are remorseful, and you have paid for your mistake. Keep letting your potential employers know this, and continue to tell them you are doing your very best to move forward and put the past behind you.

Practice keeping your head up, and your eyes forward. If you are having difficulty looking people in the eyes, practice by looking at the point at the bridge of the nose between the eyes for starters.

Practice discussing all the skills you DO have, versus what you lack. As you discover the various types of skills that employers are looking for in their employees, strive to learn them for yourself if you do not already have them. If you have not received a high school diploma, sign up to get your GED.
 

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
Some of the tough interview questions you may be asked include:
  • "What did you do during your time in prison to improve yourself and your situation?"
  • "Why should I hire you when I can hire someone who hasn't been in prison?"
  • "How will you show your value to my company if I hire you?"
  • "When you were in prison, how did you handle stressful situations?"
  • "What type of programs and work did you do in prison, and how was your performance rated?"
One human resources professional says: "Be honest about the past. Ex-offenders should take responsibility for their actions and keep their explanation in legal terms whenever possible. For example, say 'I committed a felony four,' instead of 'I was convicted of domestic violence.' (Source: HR.com, Communities)



You are in a unique situation to help potential employers understand certain things about how life in prison may affect certain aspects of the job. For example, if you have spent a lot of time waiting for electronic doors to open before you pass through, it might take a while for you to get used to opening a door yourself.

Or, you may not have been allowed to approach a prison visiting room vending machine - your visitor may have had to make the purchase and bring it back to your table - so if you appear reluctant to step near certain areas on the factory floor on your new job, you can explain why.

Or, if you are still moving a bit slowly because you were only released a few days ago, you can explain that you'll be getting back up to speed as the newness of being back in a faster-paced world begins to wear off.

Spend your non-work or non-job-search time wisely. Volunteer. Offer to speak with youth groups about your situation and what led you there. These types of activities can also help you build references.

Be sure you can address how your skills will help meet your potential employer's needs. For example, if you are looking for a job at the grocery store's deli counter, and you had learned food service sanitation skills while in prison, mention up front in your cover letter that one excellent reason why they should consider you for the deli counter position is your ability to scour and sanitize your work area to the highest health department levels.

In my lens entitled Cover Letter Writing Help, I discuss how to make a worksheet that will help you identify your potential employer's needs and how you can meet those needs.

Also, here at www.JobInterviewTechnique.net you will find some of the most powerful job interviewing strategies I've ever come across.


<!--INFOLINKS_OFF-->
<!--/module-->How To Find A Job After Prison - Some Observations

<!--INFOLINKS_ON-->
draft_lens5676752module43853892photo_1246984052Best_Foot.jpg
In some of my former jobs, I occasionally worked with individuals who had been incarcerated. Here are some observations and stories that will hopefully help you.

Stop playing the blame game. We all have stories about our terrible childhoods or abusive relationships that we say caused our problems. The truth is this: No one other than ourselves causes our problems. The sooner we stop blaming others for our situations, the better our futures will begin to look.

Bring an attitude filled with perspective and optimism to your job search. Yes, you will have challenges. Lots of them. But let's think about this for a second: You HAVE an opportunity to find a job. Some people don't. If you can look at this activity as a puzzle that you are determined to put together, you will. When you find a company you want to work at, offer to prove yourself on a temporary or even voluntary basis for a few days to show the company what you can do.

Dress nicely. I realize that you may not have an extensive wardrobe at this stage of your life, but you CAN find clean and tidy clothes to wear. Most cities and even smaller towns have thrift stores or Salvation Armies, or Good Will stores that can help you. Some places might even donate some clothes to you.

If you have tattoos - regardless of whether they are prison tattoos or not - do your best to conceal them. The time you spend job hunting and interviewing is not the time to be showing off your body art or piercings. While you may hardly notice them, others may be distracted by them. And don't you want the focus to be on who you are and what you can do, rather than what you are wearing?

While we're on the subject of appearance, good grooming is going to be critical for you. Make sure you've got a nice haircut, or if you have long hair, be sure it's always neatly tied back. Clean, clean, clean, clean!

Oh, and please - no cologne! I've seen young people come out of prison and they can't wait to drench themselves in scents. It is extremely distracting, and will not help your chances of getting a job. Good old fashioned soap, shampoo, and deodorant - and clean clothes - will do the trick! (Additional note about clean clothes - I have noticed that many folks will shower, but not launder their clothes - and unfortunately, the odor of stale clothes can be mistaken for body odor. Don't take the chance! Wash the clothes...)

Do not go job hunting with friends or relatives. If you need advice or backup, go to the local employment office. Friends and relatives may be ok for some networking, but they should not be accompanying you.

Carry a portfolio - a nice, neat folder or binder - with your resume, pages showing any work or writing you've done, any certificates you've earned, etc. If you are going to a specific company, find an article or story about them that shows them in a positive light, cut it out, and bring it with you to show them, or give them in case their public relations department might like it.

This shows you are serious, and indicates that you're not just knocking on every door in town (even if you are). Also, because employers may be leery about hiring an ex-offender because they aren't sure it's worth the risk, if you can SHOW them that you're worth the risk - through your words, attitude, appearance, posture, portfolio, and ability to take full responsibility for what you did without blaming others - you'll stand a better chance of getting hired.

If you have been accustomed to swearing or using slang, you will need to work on this to get out of the habit. I've had to work extensively on this with former clients who really did just "get stuck" that way. Get out of that habit as fast as possible, and beware of letting things slip.

Find out from the employment agencies which companies might be taking advantage of certain federal credits that encourage employers to hire ex-offenders.

If you want to work a 35 hour per week job, work 35 hours per week LOOKING for a job. Treat your job search as though it were a job. And let employers know that you are treating it like a job. If you can tell an employer you are working full-time on finding work, it will show that employer that you are already on a schedule, and that you are serious.

Even if you are turned down for a job, write a very short thank you note thanking the employer for the opportunity to meet. Make it clear that you do appreciate it, and that you are hopeful that if another opportunity arises, that they will consider you.

Some studies indicate that 70% of offenders are high school dropouts. If you are among this population, please get your GED. You must improve your skills, your reading and writing abilities, and your basic math abilities. Even if school was difficult for you, there are terrific programs now available to help individuals raise their basic skill levels. Show your potential employers that you are working to better educate yourself and that you are working on gaining various skills.
 

varrinique

FM MoDz
Freestyle Nation
FreestyleMania.com
ClubFreestyle.Com
NHBFreestyle.Com
FreestyleRemix.Com
NYFreestyle.Com
MaximumFreestyle.Com
LatinFreestyle.Com
Freestyle.FM Dee Jays
<!--INFOLINKS_OFF-->
<!--/module-->How To Find a Job After Prison - Some Web-Based Resources

<!--INFOLINKS_ON-->
draft_lens5676752module43853902photo_1246984523computer_drawing.jpg
As you learn more and more about how to find a job after prison, here are some web-based resources that may assist you along the way:

Andre Norman's story "Life After Prison - The Road Home, Vanishing Dreams" found at his website www.ProjectFootprints.com is one of the more moving and realistic stories I've read from someone who left prison with a lot of dreams. Andre's account about how he feels prior to being released from prison are similar to some I've heard from other ex-offenders. I think it is worth reading.

The Legal Action Center: Their mission states that they are "the only non-profit law and policy organization in the United States whose sole mission is to fight discrimination against people with histories of addiction, HIV/AIDS, or criminal records, and to advocate for sound public policies in these areas." www.lac.org

The Women's Prison Association. Their mission states that "WPA is a service and advocacy organization committed to helping women with criminal justice histories realize new possibilities for themselves and their families." www.wpaonline.org

The National H.I.R.E. Network (Helping Individuals with Criminal Records Reenter Through Employment). The National H.I.R.E. Network's mission is "to increase the number and quality of job opportunities available to people with criminal records by improving public policies, practices, and public opinion." www.hirenetwork.org

www.JobInterviewTechnique.net This is a commercial site offering very powerful job hunting and job interview technique strategies.
 
Top